Tooth - Angiectasis

Image of angiectasis in the tooth from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Tooth - Angiectasis in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study. There are numerous dilated blood vessels in the tooth pulp (arrow), consistent with angiectasis.
Figure 1 of 2
Image of angiectasis in the tooth from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Tooth - Angiectasis in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1). There are numerous dilated blood vessels with unremarkable endothelial cells in the tooth pulp.
Figure 2 of 2
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comment:

The dental pulp is located in the pulp cavity and is composed of delicate connective tissue interspersed with small blood vessels, lymphatics, sensory nerves, and primitive connective tissue cells. Angiectasis (vascular ectasia) of the tooth consists of variable-sized, dilated vascular spaces lined by a single layer of well-differentiated endothelium ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ) in the pulp cavity. There is no apparent increase in numbers of vessels, and the stroma of the organ is unaltered. Angiectasis in the pulp is a common incidental finding.

The difference between angiectasis and hemangioma can be unclear. Hemangiomas tend to be well-circumscribed unencapsulated masses composed of tightly packed dilated vascular spaces. Each vascular space is enclosed and lined by a single layer of normal-appearing endothelial cells aligned on collagenous septa, which are usually thin, although some have broad collagenous stroma. Angiectasis does not usually present as a well-circumscribed mass, as the dilated vascular channels often course irregularly through connective tissue.

recommendation:

Angiectasis should be diagnosed and given a severity grade whenever present.

references:

Eustis SL, Boorman GA, Harada T, Popp JA. 1990. Liver. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat (Boorman GA, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 71-94.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Long PH, Leininger JR. 1999. Teeth. In: Pathology of the Mouse (Maronpot RR, ed). Cache River Press, St Louis, MO, 13-28.
Abstract: http://www.cacheriverpress.com/books/pathmouse.htm