Seminal Vesicle - Atrophy

Image of atrophy in the seminal vesicle from a male B6C3F1 mouse in an subchronic study
Seminal Vesicle - Atrophy. Atrophy of the seminal vesicle in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a subchronic study.
Figure 1 of 4
Image of atrophy in the seminal vesicle from a male B6C3F1 mouse in an subchronic study
Seminal Vesicle - Atrophy. Higher magnification of Figure 1. Atrophy of the seminal vesicle in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a subchronic study.
Figure 2 of 4
Image of atrophy in the seminal vesicle from a male F344/N rat in an subchronic study
Seminal Vesicle - Atrophy. Atrophy of the seminal vesicle in a male F344/N rat from a subchronic study.
Figure 3 of 4
Image of atrophy in the seminal vesicle from a male F344/N rat in an subchronic study
Seminal Vesicle - Atrophy. Higher magnification of Figure 3. Atrophy of the seminal vesicle in a male F344/N rat from a subchronic study.
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comment:

Seminal vesicle atrophy is characterized by a reduction in the size and number of glandular components and lining epithelial cells of the seminal vesicle. This is associated with secretory depletion and an increased prominence of the contracted fibromuscular stroma. Atrophy may be accompanied by the formation of small papillary folds in the glands ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ). Alternatively, there may be collapse of the mucosa, with formation of glandular-appearing structures lined by cuboidal to low cuboidal epithelium ( Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window ). Seminal vesicle atrophy may occur as an age-related change when the depletion of androgenic hormone has a profound atrophic effect on accessory sex organs, including the seminal vesicle. Estrogens decrease the volume of the glandular epithelium and increase the prominence of the fibromuscular stroma in the seminal vesicle. Treatment with anti-androgenic substances also leads to the atrophy of the seminal vesicle. Administration of doxorubicin in rats induces atrophic changes in several organs, including the seminal vesicle. Deficiency of the Egr family of zinc finger transcription factors like Egr4 and Egr1 as in Egr4-Egr1 double-mutant mice leads to atrophy of seminal vesicle, prostate, epididymis, and testis.

recommendation:

Seminal vesicle atrophy should be diagnosed and graded. When present In both seminal vesicles, the diagnosis should be clarified as bilateral and severity based on the more severely affected seminal vesicle. Comments in the pathology narrative should address whether seminal vesicle atrophy is exacerbated by treatment and should identify related changes in other male reproductive tissues.

references:

Boorman GA, Elwell MR, Mitsumori K. 1990. Male accessory sex glands, penis, and scrotum. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 419-428.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Bosland MC. 1992. Lesions in the male accessory glands and penis. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Rat, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 443-467.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Comereski CR, Pedan WM, Davidson TJ, Warner GL, Hirth RS, Frantz JD. 1994. BR96-doxorubicin conjugate (BMS-182248) versus doxorubicin: A comparative toxicity assessment in rats. Toxicol Pathol 22:473-488.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7899776

Creasy D, Bube A, de Rijk E, Kandori H, Kuwahara M, Masson R, Nolte T, Reams R, Regan K, Rehm S, Rogerson P, Whitney K. 2012. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse male reproductive system. Toxicol Pathol 40:40S-121S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22949412

Gayton F, Bellido C, Aguilar R, Lucena MC. 1986. Morphometric analysis of the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicles during prepubertal development: Effects of neonatal treatment with estrogen. Biol Reprod 35:219-225.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3741952

Gordon LR, Majka JA, Boorman GA. 1996. Spontaneous nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions and experimentally induced neoplasms of the testes and accessory sex glands. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Mouse, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, Carlton WW, Sundberg JP, Ward JM, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 421-441.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Greaves P. 2007. Male genital tract. In: Histopathology of Preclinical Toxicity Studies: Interpretation and Relevance in Drug Safety Evaluation. 3rd ed. Academic Press, San Diego, 661-716.
Abstract: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780444527714

Suwa T, Nyska A, Peckham JC, Hailey JR, Mahler JF, Haseman JK, Maronpot RR. 2001. A retrospective analysis of background lesions and tissue accountability for male accessory sex organs in Fischer-344 rats. Toxicol Pathol 29(4):467-478.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11560252

Suwa T, Nyska A, Haseman JK, Mahler JF, Maronpot RR. 2002. Spontaneous lesions in control B6C3F1 mice and recommended sectioning of male accessory sex organs. Toxicol Pathol 30(2):228-234.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11950166