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Regulatory Actions for Year 2001


California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA)

Notice Type Title Summary of Notice NTP Information Cited CASRN
Notice Chemical Listed Effective November 16, 2001 as Known to the State of California to Cause Cancer: Methyleugenol The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) of the California Environmental Protection Agency is adding the chemical methyleugenol to the list of chemicals known to the State to cause cancer for purposes of the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65). The chemical is listed effective November 16, 2001. Toxicological Endpoint: Cancer

November 16, 2001 -- Proposition 65
National Toxicology Program (NTP, 2000a). Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies ofMethyleugenol (CAS No. 93-15-2) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Studies). NTP Technical Report Series No. 491 NIH Publication No. 00-3950. 93-15-2
Notice Chemicals Delisted Effective April 6, 2001 as Known to the State to Cause Cancer The California Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) is the lead agency for the implementation of the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65). As the lead agency, OEHHA is removing saccharin from the list of chemicals known to the state to cause cancer, for purposes of Proposition 65. Saccharin [CAS No. 81-07-2] was originally added to the Proposition 65 list on October 1, 1989. This chemical was added to the Proposition 65 list as a result of the issuance of a judicial decision enforcing Labor Code Section 6382(b)(1) and (d) which are incorporated by reference as Proposition 65 listing provisions pursuant to Health and Safety Code Section 25249.8(b). Labor Code Section 6382(b)(1) requires inclusion of substances listed as human or animal carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Labor Code Section 6382(d) requires the inclusion of chemicals identified as carcinogens or potential carcinogens by IARC or the National Toxicology Program (NTP). Saccharin was identified by IARC and NTP as causing cancer.

April 06, 2001 -- Proposition 65
In 2000, NTP released its Ninth Report on Carcinogens in which it delisted saccharin [CAS No. 81 07-2] from the list of substances reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen. 
National Toxicology Program (NTP, 2000). Report on Carcinogens, Ninth Edition: Carcinogen Profiles. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
81-07-2
Notice Chemicals Listed Effective February 23, 2001 as Known to the State to Cause Cancer or Reproductive Toxicity: 13 chemicals The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) of the California Environmental Protection Agency is adding thirteen chemicals to the list of chemicals known to the State to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity for purposes of the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65). The chemicals are listed effective February 27, 2001. Ethoprop, indium phosphide, lynestrenol, norethynodrel, and propachlor are listed pursuant to an administrative listing mechanism provided under Proposition 65, based upon a formal identification by an authoritative body that the chemicals cause cancer.

February 23, 2001 -- Proposition 65
National Toxicology Program (NTP, 2000a). Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Indium Phosphide (CAS No. 22398-80-7) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies). Board Draft. NTP Technical Report Series No. 499. NTIS Publication No. 00-4433. 22398-80-7

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Notice Type Title Summary of Notice NTP Information Cited CASRN
Final Rule National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guidelines Levels (AEGLs) for Hazardous Substances; Proposed AEGL Values. The EPA is proposing AEGLs for 18 chemicals to provide Federal, State, and local agencies with threshold short-term exposure limits for the public to hazardous, airborne chemicals.

May 02, 2001 -- 66 FR 21940
The EPA used data from the NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Tetrachloroethylene (TR-311) and Tetranitromethane (TR-386) in determining the proposed AEGL values for these two chemicals. 509-14-8
127-18-4
Final Rule Control of Air Pollution from New Motor Vehicles: Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle Standards and Highway Diesel Fuel Sulfur Control Requirements. The EPA is setting new diesel exhaust emission standards for heavy-duty highway engines to protect the public's health. Health studies indicate potential hazards that appear to be related to acute and chronic exposure.

January 18, 2001 -- 66 FR 5002
The EPA cited the NTP as an example of a governmental agency that has identified diesel exhaust particles as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen.(Ninth Report on Carcinogens).
Final Rule Lead and Lead Compounds: Lowering of Reporting Thresholds The EPA is lowering the reporting thresholds for lead and lead compounds which are subject to reporting under section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act and section 6607 of the Pollution Prevention Act.

January 17, 2001 -- 66 FR 4500
Commenters contended that the Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxic Chemicals (PBT) rule framework was designed only for organic substances and is being incorrectly applied to metals. The EPA disagreed citing, as an example, the NTP's criteria for characterizing chemical carcinogens is the same for organic as well as inorganic substances to support its position that it is scientifically valid to establish generic criteria that are applicable to all substances. (8th Report on Carcinogens)

Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA)

Notice Type Title Summary of Notice NTP Information Cited CASRN
Final Rule Diesel Particulate Matter Exposure of Underground Coal Miners The Department of Labor is establishing new health standards for underground coal mines that use equipment powered by diesel engines. High concentrations of diesel particulate matter (DPM) increases the risk of serious health hazards in underground mines.

January 19, 2001 -- 66 FR 5525
The NTP is listed as one of many scientific organizations and governmental agencies that has reviewed the available epidemiologic and toxicological evidence for carcinogenicity and has identified dpm as a probable human carcinogen. (9th Report on Carcinogens)