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Stomach, Forestomach - Foreign Body

Image of foreign body in the forestomach from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Stomach, Forestomach - Foreign body in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study. A foreign body (hair) (arrow) has penetrated the epithelium and submucosa.
Figure 1 of 2
Image of foreign body in the forestomach from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Stomach, Forestomach - Foreign body in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1). A foreign body (hair) (arrow) with associated granulomatous inflammation is present in the submucosa.
Figure 2 of 2
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comment:

Hair or feed material can become embedded in the wall of the forestomach secondary to injury from a gavage procedure or ulceration from xenobiotics. In Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , a small granuloma with a central hair shaft (arrow) is in the submucosa; the overlying mucosa has healed from a previous injury. This is considered a small incidental lesion in a control animal that may have occurred secondary to previous gavage trauma.

recommendation:

A primary foreign body should be diagnosed but not graded. If a foreign body causes a significant inflammatory response, then both the foreign body and inflammation are diagnosed. A foreign body such as hairs or feed material that has been passively pushed into an ulcerated area should not be diagnosed separately but can be described in the narrative.

references:

Brown HR, Hardisty JF. 1990. Oral cavity, esophagus and stomach. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat (Boorman GA, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 9-30.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Leininger JR, Jokinen MP, Dangler CA, Whiteley LO. 1999. Oral cavity, esophagus, and stomach. In: Pathology of the Mouse (Maronpot RR, ed). Cache River Press, St Louis, MO, 29-48.
Abstract: http://www.cacheriverpress.com/books/pathmouse.htm