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Salivary Gland - Hemorrhage

Image of hemorrhage in the salivary gland from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Salivary gland - Hemorrhage in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study.
Figure 1 of 2
Image of hemorrhage in the salivary gland from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Salivary gland - Hemorrhage in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1).
Figure 2 of 2
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comment:

Hemorrhage can occur secondary to trauma, inflammation of vessels, or vascular damage secondary to chemical toxicity. Hemorrhage is frequently seen in areas of necrosis. Hemorrhage should be differentiated from angiectasis. With angiectasis, a careful search will confirm that the blood is actually contained within spaces lined with endothelial cells.

recommendation:

Hemorrhage should be diagnosed and graded based on the extent and number of areas involved. If hemorrhage is a part of another lesion (e.g., necrosis, inflammation, or neoplasia), it should not be diagnosed separately unless warranted by severity but should be described in the narrative.

references:

Botts S, Jokinen M, Gaillard ET, Elwell MR, Mann PC. 1999. Salivary, Harderian, and lacrimal glands. In: Pathology of the Mouse (Maronpot RR, ed). Cache River Press, St Louis, MO, 49-80.
Abstract: http://www.cacheriverpress.com/books/pathmouse.htm