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Adrenal Gland - Mineralization

Image of mineralization in the adrenal gland from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Adrenal gland, Cortex - Mineralization in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study. There are multiple foci of coarsely granular, dark basophilic material in the cortex (arrows).
Figure 1 of 2
Image of mineralization in the adrenal gland from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Adrenal gland, Cortex - Mineralization in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1). There is a focus of coarsely granular, dark basophilic material in the cortex (arrow).
Figure 2 of 2
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comment:

Mineralization in the adrenal gland ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ) in rats and mice is usually the dystrophic form and is a sequela to other lesions, such as necrosis, hemorrhage, or thrombosis. It therefore tends to occur with generally low, sporadic incidences unrelated to treatment. The cortex is more often affected than the medulla.

Mineralization is characterized as variably sized, discrete aggregates of finely to coarsely granular dark basophilic material ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ) that are scattered through the adrenal parenchyma, often adjacent to or within areas of fibrosis, degeneration, necrosis, hemorrhage, and/or thrombosis.

recommendation:

If mineralization of the adrenal gland occurs as a primary, treatment-related change, it should be diagnosed and assigned a severity grade and site modifier (i.e., cortex, medulla, or capsule). Mineralization that is a feature of another pathologic process (e.g., fibrosis or thrombosis) should not be diagnosed separately, unless warranted by severity.

references:

Frith CH, Botts S, Jokinen MP, Eighmy JJ, Hailey JR, Morgan SJ, Chandra M. 2000. Non-proliferative lesions of the endocrine system in rats, E-1. In: Guides for Toxicologic Pathology. STP/ARP/AFIP, Washington, DC.
Full Text: https://www.toxpath.org/ssdnc/EndocrineNonprolifRat.pdf

Hamlin MH, Banas DA. 1990. Adrenal gland. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 501-518.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

National Toxicology Program. 1999. NTP TR-481. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Oleic Acid Diethanolamine Condensate (CAS No. 93-83-4) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Dermal Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/9764

National Toxicology Program. 2007. NTP TR-543. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of α-Methylstyrene (CAS No. 98-83-9) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/28010

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.