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Gallbladder - Inflammation

Image of inflammation in the gallbladder from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Gallbladder inflammation in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study.
Figure 1 of 6
Image of inflammation in the gallbladder from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Gallbladder inflammation in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1).
Figure 2 of 6
Image of inflammation in the gallbladder from a male  B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Gallbladder inflammation in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study.
Figure 3 of 6
Image of inflammation in the gallbladder from a male  B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Gallbladder inflammation in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study.
Figure 4 of 6
Image of inflammation in the gallbladder from a female B6C3F1 mouse in an acute study
Gallbladder inflammation in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a 28-day study.
Figure 5 of 6
Image of inflammation in the gallbladder from a female B6C3F1 mouse in an acute study
Gallbladder inflammation in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a 28-day study (higher magnification of Figure 5).
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comment:

Inflammation of the gallbladder may involve acute inflammatory cell infiltrates in the lumen ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ), but more commonly inflammatory infiltration occurs primarily in the gallbladder wall and is accompanied by hyperplasia of the mucosal lining. Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window show dense cytoplasmic hyaline deposits in the hyperplastic epithelial lining of the gall bladder. Inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis) may be associated with mucosal ulcers or erosions and hemorrhage ( Figure 5image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 6image opens in a pop-up window ). Cholecystitis is more commonly seen in older mice.

recommendation:

Inflammation of the gallbladder should be diagnosed whenever present and given a severity grade. A modifier describing the character of the inflammation (i.e., acute, suppurative, chronic, chronic active, or granulomatous) should be included in the diagnosis (for a description of these modifiers, see “Liver – Inflammation, Focal”). The character of the inflammation and any other morphologic features should also be described in the pathology narrative. Accompanying lesions, such as ulceration or hyaline droplet accumulation, should be diagnosed separately if sufficiently prominent.

references:

Greaves P. 2007. Histopathology of Preclinical Toxicity Studies: Interpretation and Relevance in Drug Safety Evaluation, 3rd ed. Elsevier, Amsterdam.
Abstract: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780444527714

Harada T, Enomoto A, Boorman GA, Maronpot RR. 1999. Liver and gallbladder. In: Pathology of the Mouse: Reference and Atlas (Maronpot RR, Boorman GA, Gaul BW, eds). Cache River Press, Vienna, IL, 119-183.
Abstract: http://www.cacheriverpress.com/books/pathmouse.htm

Thoolen B, Maronpot RR, Harada T, Nyska A, Rousseaux C, Nolte T, Malarkey D, Kaufmann W, Kutter K, Deschl U, Nakae D, Gregson R, Winlove M, Brix A, Singl B, Belpoggi F, Ward JM. 2010. Hepatobiliary lesion nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for lesions in rats and mice (INHAND). Toxicol Pathol 38:5S-81S.
Full Text: http://tpx.sagepub.com/content/38/7_suppl/5S.full

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.