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Liver - Extramedullary Hematopoiesis

Image of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver from a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a chronic study
Extramedullary hematopoiesis-arrows indicate erythroid cells in a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat from a chronic study.
Figure 1 of 4
Image of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver from a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a chronic study
Extramedullary hematopoiesis-arrow indicates erythroid cells, and arrowhead indicates a megakaryocyte, in a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat from a chronic study.
Figure 2 of 4
Image of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver from a male  B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Extramedullary hematopoiesis in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study.
Figure 3 of 4
Image of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver from a male  B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Extramedullary hematopoiesis in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study.
Figure 4 of 4
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comment:

Extramedullary hematopoiesis is unexpected in adult rodents and is typically associated with pathologic conditions. It is distinguished from inflammatory cell infiltrates by the presence of nucleated erythrocytes, immature granulocytes, and/or undifferentiated progenitor cells in the absence of associated hepatocellular necrosis. Clusters of erythroid cells are present in Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window (arrows). It is most often seen in animals treated with a toxicant and may be associated with hepatocellular degeneration, pigment deposition, and/or fatty change ( Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ). A megakaryocyte is present in Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window (arrowhead). Multiple perivascular cellular accumulations in Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window consist predominantly of developing granulocytes.

recommendation:

Whenever present, extramedullary hematopoiesis should be diagnosed and graded. Examination of bone marrow, lymph node, and spleen sections may show a correlation with extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver. The types of cells involved (e.g., erythroid, granulocytic, mixed) should be indicated in the pathology narrative if they can be identified.

related links:

Adrenal Gland - Extramedullary Hematpoiesis
Spleen - Extramedullary Hematopoiesis

references:

Eustis SL, Boorman GA, Harada T, Popp JA. 1990. Liver. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 71-94.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Harada T, Enomoto A, Boorman GA, Maronpot RR. 1999. Liver and gallbladder. In: Pathology of the Mouse: Reference and Atlas (Maronpot RR, Boorman GA, Gaul BW, eds). Cache River Press, Vienna, IL, 119-183.
Abstract: http://www.cacheriverpress.com/books/pathmouse.htm

National Toxicology Program. 2010. NTP TR-558. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of 3,3',4,4'-Tetrachloroazobenzene (TCAB) (CAS No. 14047-09-7) in Harlan Sprague-Dawley Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Full Text: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/htdocs/LT_rpts/TR558.pdf

National Toxicology Program. 2010. NTP TR-559. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of 2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 118) (CAS No. 31508-00-6) in Female Harlan Sprague-Dawley Rats (Gavage Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Full Text: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/htdocs/LT_rpts/TR559.pdf

Thoolen B, Maronpot RR, Harada T, Nyska A, Rousseaux C, Nolte T, Malarkey D, Kaufmann W, Kutter K, Deschl U, Nakae D, Gregson R, Winlove M, Brix A, Singl B, Belpoggi F, Ward JM. 2010. Hepatobiliary lesion nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for lesions in rats and mice (INHAND). Toxicol Pathol 38:5S-81S.
Full Text: http://tpx.sagepub.com/content/38/7_suppl/5S.full