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Thymus - Atrophy - Gallery

Image of atrophy in the thymus from a male Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a subchronic study
Thymus - Normal in a male Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat from a subchronic study. The ratio of cortex to medulla is approximately 2:1 (1:1:1, two cortices to medulla).
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a male Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a subchronic study
Thymus - Normal in a male Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat from a subchronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1). The lymphocytes are more numerous in the cortex than in the medulla.
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a female F344/Ntac rat in a subchronic study
Thymus - Atrophy in a treated female F344/NTac rat from a subchronic study. The cortex, showing minimal atrophy, is thinner and more irregular compared with normal (Figure 1).
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a female F344/Ntac rat in a subchronic study
Thymus - Atrophy in a treated female F344/NTac rat from a subchronic study (higher magnification of Figure 3). The cortex, showing minimal atrophy, is thinner and more irregular compared with normal (Figure 2).
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a chronic study
Thymus - Atrophy in a treated female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat from a chronic study. With mild atrophy, the cortex becomes progressively thinner and the cortical-medullary junction becomes less distinct.
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a chronic study
Thymus - Atrophy in a treated female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 5). The cortex is thinner, and the cortical-medullary junction is less distinct compared with Figure 4.
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a chronic study
Thymus - Atrophy in a treated female Harlan Sprague Dawley from a chronic study. With moderate atrophy, delineation of the cortex and medulla is multifocally indistinct.
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a chronic study
Thymus - Atrophy in a treated female Harlan Sprague Dawley from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 7). With moderate atrophy, delineation of the cortex and medulla is multifocally indistinct.
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a chronic study
Thymus - Atrophy in a treated female Harlan Sprague-Dawley from a chronic study. With marked atrophy, the lack of distinction between the cortex and medulla due to lymphocyte depletion gives the thymus a more uniform appearance.
Image of atrophy in the thymus from a female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rat in a chronic study
Thymus - Atrophy in a treated female Harlan Sprague-Dawley from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 9). With marked atrophy, the distinction between the thymic cortex and medulla is no longer visible due to lymphocyte depletion.
NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.