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Thymus - Mineralization

Image of mineralization in the thymus from a male B6C3F1/N mouse in a chronic study
Thymus - Mineralization in a male B6C3F1/N mouse from a chronic study. Multiple mineralized foci (arrows) are present within the thymic medulla.
Figure 1 of 2
Image of mineralization in the thymus from a male B6C3F1/N mouse in a chronic study
Thymus - Mineralization in a male B6C3F1/N mouse from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1). Mineralized foci are characterized by variably sized, densely basophilic, amorphous material (arrows).
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comment:

Mineralization does not typically occur as a primary lesion in the thymus. However, it can occur secondary to renal and/or parathyroid disease (metastatic mineralization) or with thymic necrosis (dystrophic mineralization). This lesion is characterized by variable amounts of densely basophilic, amorphous, and/or granular material ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , arrows). Mineral may occur as multifocal lesions within the thymus with renal or parathyroid disease or may occur within necrotic foci.

recommendation:

Thymic mineralization should be diagnosed and graded if associated with renal and/or parathyroid disease. Mineralization associated with thymic necrosis should not be diagnosed separately unless warranted by severity, but should be described in the pathology narrative.

references:

National Toxicology Program. 1999. NTP TR-469. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of AZT (CAS No. 30516-87-1) and AZT/α-Interferon A/D in B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/6082

Pearse G. 2006. Histopathology of the thymus. Toxicol Pathol 34:515-547.
Full Text: http://tpx.sagepub.com/content/34/5/515.long

Stefanski SA, Elwell MR, Stromberg PC. 1990. Spleen, lymph nodes, and thymus. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 369-394.

Ward JM, Mann PC, Morishima H, Frith CH. 1999. Thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes. In: Pathology of the Mouse (Maronpot RR, ed). Cache River Press, Vienna, IL, 333-360.

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.