Your browser does not support JavaScript or has JavaScript turned off. The Atlas functions best with JavaScript enabled but may used without JavaScript.

Prostate, Acinus - Atrophy

Image of normal comparision for acinar atrophy in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a subchronic study
Prostate - Normal. Normal dorsolateral prostate for comparison with Figure 3 in a male F344/N rat from a subchronic study.
Figure 1 of 4
Image of normal comparision for acinar atrophy in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a subchronic study
Prostate - Normal. Higher magnification of Figure 1. Normal dorsolateral prostate for comparison with Figure 4 in a male F344/N rat from a subchronic study.
Figure 2 of 4
Image of acinar atrophy in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a subchronic study
Prostate, Acinus - Atrophy. Decreased acinar size and absence of secretion are evident in this prostate in a male F344/N rat from a subchronic study.
Figure 3 of 4
Image of acinar atrophy in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a subchronic study
Prostate, Acinus - Atrophy. Higher magnification of Figure 3. Acinar epithelium is markedly flattened (atrophic), there is absence of luminal secretion, and asterisks indicate increased stromal prominence in a male F344/N rat from a subchronic study.
Figure 4 of 4
next arrow

comment:

Prostatic atrophy represents glandular shrinkage and is microscopically characterized by reduction in the size of acini, attenuation of lining epithelial cells, scanty secretory material, and increased stromal prominence (asterisks, Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window ). Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window represent the dorsolateral lobe of normal prostate for comparison. In general, atrophy involves all lobes of the prostate. Inhibition of gonadal steroid and pituitary hormones results in atrophy of testes and accessory sex organs, including prostate. Inhibitors of 5α-reductases, enzymes involved in intraprostatic conversion of testosterone to its biologically active form dihydrotestosterone, such as finasteride and epristeride, are known to induce atrophy of prostate. Similarly, antiandrogenic substances such as hydroxyflutamide cause prostatic atrophy.

Estrogens decrease the volume of the glandular epithelium and increase the fibromuscular stroma in both ventral prostate and seminal vesicle. Deficiency of the Egr family of zinc finger transcription factors such as Egr4 and Egr1, as in Egr4-Egr1 double-mutant mice, leads to atrophy of prostate, testis, epididymis, and seminal vesicle. Spontaneous prostatic atrophy is an age-related lesion.

recommendation:

Prostatic atrophy should be diagnosed and graded, and treatment-associated exacerbation should be indicated in the pathology narrative. The affected lobe(s) should be identified if possible and indicated in the tissue identification (e.g., prostate, dorsolateral lobe, acinus - atrophy, severe). When known, bilateral involvement should be indicated and the severity grade determined by the more severely affected lobe.

references:

Boorman GA, Elwell MR, Mitsumori K. 1990. Male accessory sex glands, penis, and scrotum. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 419-428.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Bosland MC. 1992. Lesions in the male accessory glands and penis. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Rat, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 443-467.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Creasy D, Bube A, de Rijk E, Kandori H, Kuwahara M, Masson R, Nolte T, Reams R, Regan K, Rehm S, Rogerson P, Whitney K. 2012. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse male reproductive system. Toxicol Pathol 40:40S-121S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22949412

Gao W, Kearbey JD, Nair VA, Chung K, Parlow AF, Miller DD, Dalton JT. 2004. Comparison of the pharmacological effects of a novel selective androgen receptor modulator, the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, and the antiandrogen hydroxyflutamide in intact rats: New approach for benign prostate hyperplasia. Endocrinology 145:5420-5428.
Full Text: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2098692/

Gayton F, Bellido C. Aguilar R, Lucena MC. 1986. Morphometric analysis of the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicles during prepubertal development: Effects of neonatal treatment with estrogen. Biol Reprod 35:219-225.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3741952

Gordon LR, Majka JA, Boorman GA. 1996. Spontaneous nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions and experimentally induced neoplasms of the testes and accessory sex glands. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Mouse, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, Carlton WW, Sundberg JP, Ward JM, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 421-441.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Greaves P. 2007. Male genital tract. In: Histopathology of Preclinical Toxicity Studies: Interpretation and Relevance in Drug Safety Evaluation. 3rd ed. Academic Press, San Diego, 661-716.
Abstract: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780444527714

Quin LH, Wang XL, Tu ZH. 2001. Atrophy and apoptosis in ventral prostate of rats induced by 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor epristeride. Acta Pharmacol Sin 22:399-404.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11743885

Rittmaster RS, Manning AP, Wright AS, Thomas LN, Whitefield S, Norman RW, Lazier CB, Rowden G. 1995. Evidence for atrophy and apoptosis in the ventral prostate of rats given the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Endocrinology 136:741-748.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7835306

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.