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Prostate, Acinus - Dilation

Image of acinar dilation in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Prostate, Acinus - Dilation. Acinar dilation in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
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Image of acinar dilation in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Prostate, Acinus - Dilation. Higher magnification of Figure 1. Acinar dilation in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Figure 2 of 4
Image of acinar dilation in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Prostate, Acinus - Dilation. Three dilated glands are filled with neutrophils and cellular debris (arrows) in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Figure 3 of 4
Image of acinar dilation in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Prostate, Acinus - Dilation. Higher magnification of Figure 3. Acinar dilation in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
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comment:

Ectasia or dilation of the prostate is characterized by acini that are sometimes distended with secretory material and lined by attenuated epithelial cells ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window , and Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window ). There may be marked acinar enlargement, particularly with significant compression of surrounding unaffected acini and parenchyma, with the dilation appearing cystic ( Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window ). Affected acinar secretory material can exhibit either a near normal staining reaction ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ) or can be poorly stained as in the quiescent gland shown in Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window . Affected acini can be observed in any lobe and can involve either a part or the entire lobe. This is likely an age-related lesion and may be associated with interstitial inflammation.

recommendation:

Prostatic dilatation should be recorded and given a severity grade during histopathologic evaluation of prostate from toxicity studies. The affected lobe(s) should be identified if possible and indicated in the tissue identification (e.g., prostate, dorsolateral lobe, acinus - dilation, moderate). If paired lobes are both affected, the diagnosis should be qualified as bilateral, with severity based on the more severely affected gland.

references:

Boorman GA, Elwell MR, Mitsumori K. 1990. Male accessory sex glands, penis, and scrotum. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 419-428.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Bosland MC. 1992. Lesions in the male accessory glands and penis. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Rat, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 443-467.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Creasy D, Bube A, de Rijk E, Kandori H, Kuwahara M, Masson R, Nolte T, Reams R, Regan K, Rehm S, Rogerson P, Whitney K. 2012. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse male reproductive system. Toxicol Pathol 40:40S-121S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22949412

Gordon LR, Majka JA, Boorman GA. 1996. Spontaneous nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions and experimentally induced neoplasms of the testes and accessory sex glands. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Mouse, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, Carlton WW, Sundberg JP, Ward JM, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 421-441.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Greaves P. 2007. Male genital tract. In: Histopathology of Preclinical Toxicity Studies: Interpretation and Relevance in Drug Safety Evaluation. 3rd ed. Academic Press, San Diego, 661-716.
Abstract: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780444527714

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.