Your browser does not support JavaScript or has JavaScript turned off. The Atlas functions best with JavaScript enabled but may used without JavaScript.

Prostate, Epithelium - Degeneration

Image of epithelial degeneration in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Prostate, Epithelium - Degeneration. Degeneration of the epithelium in the prostate in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Figure 1 of 3
Image of epithelial degeneration in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Prostate, Epithelium - Degeneration. Degeneration of the epithelium in the prostate in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Figure 2 of 3
Image of epithelial degeneration in the prostate from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Prostate, Epithelium - Degeneration. Degeneration of the epithelium in the prostate in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Figure 3 of 3
next arrow

comment:

Epithelial degeneration is characterized by granular to foamy cytoplasm alteration of enlarged acinar epithelial cells that form a single lining layer ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ) or exfoliate and occlude the lumen of acini ( Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window ). Affected cells are enlarged with abundant finely granular cytoplasm and may rupture and disintegrate. Epithelial degeneration can be focal or multifocal. The lesion can be observed in any lobe, but is most commonly found in the ventral lobe. Epithelial degeneration is a fairly common observation in the aging prostate. The lesion may be accompanied by inflammatory infiltrates.

recommendation:

When present, this lesion should be diagnosed and graded. Exacerbation by chemical agents warrants documentation in the pathology narrative. The affected lobe(s) should be identified if possible and indicated in the tissue identification. If paired lobes are involved, the diagnosis should indicate that the change is bilateral, with severity based on the more severely affected lobe.

references:

Bosland MC. 1992. Lesions in the male accessory glands and penis. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Rat, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 443-467.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Creasy D, Bube A, de Rijk E, Kandori H, Kuwahara M, Masson R, Nolte T, Reams R, Regan K, Rehm S, Rogerson P, Whitney K. 2012. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse male reproductive system. Toxicol Pathol 40:40S-121S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22949412

Gordon LR, Majka JA, Boorman GA. 1996. Spontaneous nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions and experimentally induced neoplasms of the testes and accessory sex glands. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Mouse, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, Carlton WW, Sundberg JP, Ward JM, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 421-441.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Greaves P. 2007. Male genital tract. In: Histopathology of Preclinical Toxicity Studies: Interpretation and Relevance in Drug Safety Evaluation. 3rd ed. Academic Press, San Diego, 661-716.
Abstract: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780444527714

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.