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Prostate - Mineralization

Image of mineralization in the prostate from a male Osborne-Mendel rat in a chronic study
Prostate - Mineralization. Mineralization of the prostate in a male Osborne-Mendel rat from a chronic study.
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Image of mineralization in the prostate from a male Osborne-Mendel rat in a chronic study
Prostate - Mineralization. Higher magnification of Figure 1. Mineralization of the prostate in a male Osborne-Mendel rat from a chronic study.
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comment:

Mineralization is characterized by focal to diffuse accumulation of basophilic, anisotropic, irregular granular material that may involve the glandular acini ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ) or vessel wall. This degree of mineralization is unusual. Two types of mineralization may occur: metastatic (calcification of normal tissue associated with high blood levels of calcium) or dystrophic (mineral deposits in abnormal or degenerating tissue not associated with increased blood levels of calcium).

recommendation:

Mineralization should be diagnosed during histopathologic evaluation of prostate and given a severity grade. The affected lobe(s) should be identified if possible and indicated in the tissue identification. If paired lobes are affected, the diagnosis should be indicated as bilateral and the degree of severity based on more severely affected lobe.

references:

Boorman GA, Elwell MR, Mitsumori K. 1990. Male accessory sex glands, penis, and scrotum. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 419-428.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Bosland MC. 1992. Lesions in the male accessory glands and penis. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Rat, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 443-467.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Greaves P. 2007. Male genital tract. In: Histopathology of Preclinical Toxicity Studies: Interpretation and Relevance in Drug Safety Evaluation. 3rd ed. Academic Press, San Diego, 661-716.
Abstract: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780444527714

Mitsumori K. 1990. Blood and lymphatic vessels. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 473-484.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Suwa T, Nyska A, Peckham JC, Hailey JR, Mahler JF, Haseman JK, Maronpot RR. 2001. A retrospective analysis of background lesions and tissue accountability for male accessory sex organs in Fischer-344 rats. Toxicol Pathol 29(4):467-478.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11560252

Suwa T, Nyska A, Haseman JK, Mahler JF, Maronpot RR. 2002. Spontaneous lesions in control B6C3F1 mice and recommended sectioning of male accessory sex organs. Toxicol Pathol 30(2):228-234.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11950166

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.