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Seminal Vesicle - Mineralization

Image of mineralization in the seminal vesicle from a male F344/N rat in an chronic study
Seminal Vesicle - Mineralization. Arrows indicate multifocal mineral deposits in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Figure 1 of 3
Image of mineralization in the seminal vesicle from a male F344/N rat in an chronic study
Seminal Vesicle - Mineralization. Higher magnification of Figure 1. Arrows indicate multifocal mineral deposits in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Figure 2 of 3
Image of mineralization in the seminal vesicle from a male F344/N rat in an chronic study
Seminal Vesicle - Mineralization. Higher magnification of Figure 2. Multifocal mineral deposit in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Figure 3 of 3
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comment:

Mineralization consists of deposition of irregular amorphous basophilic material ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , and Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window ). It can be focal or multifocal (arrows, Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ). Mineralization is uncommon in the seminal vesicle and is likely an incidental finding not associated with chemical treatment. Metastatic mineralization occurs in normal tissues and is associated with elevated blood calcium levels. Dystrophic mineral deposits occur in abnormal tissues and are not associated with elevated blood calcium levels. In Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , and Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window , the seminal vesicle is atrophic with increased connective tissue, indicating that the mineralization is probably dystrophic.

recommendation:

Mineralization should be diagnosed and given a severity grade. If both seminal vesicles are involved, the diagnosis should be qualified as bilateral, and the severity grade should be based on the more severely affect seminal vesicle.

references:

Boorman GA, Elwell MR, Mitsumori K. 1990. Male accessory sex glands, penis, and scrotum. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, Montgomery CA, MacKenzie WF, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 419-428.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/9002563

Creasy D, Bube A, de Rijk E, Kandori H, Kuwahara M, Masson R, Nolte T, Reams R, Regan K, Rehm S, Rogerson P, Whitney K. 2012. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse male reproductive system. Toxicol Pathol 40:40S-121S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22949412

Gordon LR, Majka JA, Boorman GA. 1996. Spontaneous nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions and experimentally induced neoplasms of the testes and accessory sex glands. In: Pathobiology of the Aging Mouse, Vol 1 (Mohr U, Dungworth DL, Capen CC, Carlton WW, Sundberg JP, Ward JM, eds). ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 421-441.
Abstract: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008994685

Radovsky A, Mitsumori K, Chapin RE. 1999. Male reproductive tract. In: Pathology of the Mouse: Reference and Atlas (Maronpot RR, Boorman GA, Gaul BW, eds). Cache River Press, Vienna, IL, 381-407.
Abstract: http://www.cacheriverpress.com/books/pathmouse.htm

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.