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Brain - Necrosis - Gallery

Image of necrosis in the brain from an F344/N rat
Appearance of a thalamic infarct at low magnification, identified by pallor within the zone of the black arrows, in an F344/N rat. The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is identified by a white arrow. This infarct was the result of an arterial embolus (arrowhead), shown at higher magnification in Figure 2.
Image of necrosis in the brain from an F344/N rat
Arterial embolus from Figure 1 at higher magnification, in an F344/N rat.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a male F344/N rat in an acute study
Acute necrosis of the posterior colliculus, a bilaterally symmetrical lesion (arrows), in the whole mount of a section in a male F344/N rat from a 4-day study. This resulted from the selective vulnerability of this brain region to toxin-induced impaired energy metabolism. The arrowhead identifies necrosis of the nucleus of the lateral lemniscus.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a male F344/N rat in an acute study
Similar regionally selective bilateral brain necrosis of the parietal cortex area 1 (blue arrow), thalamus (arrowhead), and retrosplenial cortex (white arrow) in a treated male F344/N rat from a 4-day study, all resulting from the same toxic compound as used in Figure 3.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a female F344/N rat in a chronic study
Unusual form of malacia (total regional necrosis) of the spinal cord in the dorsal spinal funiculi (arrow) in a female F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a male B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
A cortical infarct with gliosis and capillary hyperplasia (arrow) from a male B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
A more advanced stage of cortical infarction (arrows) in a treated female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic chronic inhalation study.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a  F344/N rat in a  study
Morphology of an infarct of known duration (arrow) in an F344/N rat with experimental infarction.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Later stage of cortical infarction, with loss of tissue and collapse of the cortical structure creating a depression at the meningeal surface (arrows), in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a  F344/N rat in an acute study
Detail of the cellular responses in cortical infarction of known 72-hour duration in an F344/N rat with experimental infarction. Note the hypertrophic and hyperplastic state of the capillary endothelium and the prominent macrophage presence (arrows).
Image of necrosis in the brain from a male B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Olfactory bulb necrosis in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study. Note that the substance of the olfactory bulb is lost (arrows) as a result of marked tissue necrosis, leaving only cellular debris and hemorrhage.
Image of necrosis in the brain from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Necrotic hippocampal tissue as identified by microtubule-associated protein-2 immunohistochemistry, in a control female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study. The arrows demark the region of necrosis.
NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.