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Nose, Epithelium - Fibrosis

Image of fibrosis in the nose, transitional epithelium from a female B6C3F1/N mouse in a chronic study
Nose, Transitional epithelium - Fibrosis in a female B6C3F1/N mouse from a chronic study. Eosinophilic fibrillar material expands the lamina propria, separating the epithelium from the glands in the lamina propria.
Figure 1 of 2
Image of normal in the nose, transitional epithelium from a male B6C3F1/N mouse in a chronic study
Nose, Transitional epithelium - Normal in a male B6C3F1/N mouse from a chronic study. This normal lateral wall in the nose is presented for comparison with Figure 2. A tooth (asterisk) is visible in the section.
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comment:

Fibrosis appears microscopically as an increase in the amount of fibrous connective tissue that either replaces or expands normal structures. Because it is often a response to severe tissue damage, fibrosis is often associated with inflammation and/or necrosis. Fibrosis in the lamina propria of the nose ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window ; compare with control shown in Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ) is uncommon.

recommendation:

Fibrosis is an uncommon lesion in the nasal cavity and should be diagnosed and assigned a severity grade whenever it is observed. As with inflammation, the epithelial cell type associated with the fibrosis should be recorded as a site modifier. Other lesions, such as the inflammation and hyperplasia noted above, should be diagnosed separately.

references:

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.