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Nose - Hyperplasia, Goblet Cell

Image of hyperplasia, goblet cell in the nose, respiratory epithelium from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Nose, Respiratory epithelium - Hyperplasia, Goblet cell in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study. Goblet cells are increased in number in the epithelium lining the nasal septum.
Figure 1 of 5
Image of hyperplasia, goblet cell in the nose, respiratory epithelium from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Nose, Respiratory epithelium - Hyperplasia, Goblet cell in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study. Goblet cells are increased in number in the epithelium on one side of the nasal septum (top); the opposite side is lined by metaplastic squamous epithelium.
Figure 2 of 5
Image of hyperplasia, goblet cell in the nose, respiratory epithelium from a male F344/N rat in a subchronic study
Nose, Respiratory epithelium - Hyperplasia, Goblet cell (right) and normal respiratory epithelium (left) of the nasopharyngeal duct in a male F344/N rat from a subchronic study. Image provided courtesy of Dr. R. Miller.
Figure 3 of 5
Image of hyperplasia, goblet cell in the nose, respiratory epithelium from a male F344/N rat in a subchronic study
Nose, Respiratory epithelium - Hyperplasia, Goblet cell in the nasopharyngeal duct in a male F344/N rat from a subchronic study. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of goblet cell hyperplasia is on the left, and periodic acid�Schiff staining is on the right. Image provided courtesy of Dr. R. Miller.
Figure 4 of 5
Image of hyperplasia, goblet cell in the nose, transitional epithelium from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Nose, Transitional epithelium - Hyperplasia, Goblet cell in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study. Increased numbers of goblet cells are present in the epithelium lining the turbinate, with coalescence of goblet cells on one side of the turbinate (arrow).
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comment:

Goblet (mucous) cell hyperplasia ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window , and Figure 5image opens in a pop-up window ) is seen after exposure to some irritants and may be the only change noted in response to short-term exposure to a mild irritant. It is most often seen in areas of the nasal cavity that are lined by transitional and respiratory epithelium (levels I and II). The respiratory epithelium normally contains a few goblet cells; the term "metaplasia" may be more correct when the lesion is present in the transitional epithelium (which normally lacks goblet cells). However, to maintain consistency, the NTP prefers the term "hyperplasia" for this lesion, regardless of the epithelial type. The lesion is characterized by the presence of (in transitional epithelium) or increase in the number of (in respiratory epithelium) goblet cells in the epithelial lining. The goblet cells may form intraepithelial glands, or they may coalesce to form mucous cysts ( Figure 5image opens in a pop-up window , arrow). Goblet cell hyperplasia has been seen in both short- and long-term studies. It is thought to be an adaptive response to irritant exposure and is not considered a preneoplastic change.

recommendation:

Goblet cell hyperplasia should be diagnosed whenever it is present and assigned a severity grade. The type of epithelium affected should be indicated in the diagnosis by a site modifier (e.g., respiratory epithelium or transitional epithelium). The goblet cells may be enlarged or hypertrophied, but goblet cell hypertrophy should not be concurrently diagnosed; rather, the hypertrophy should be described in the pathology narrative. Associated lesions, such as inflammation or epithelial hyperplasia, should be diagnosed separately.

references:

Boorman GA, Morgan KT, Uraih LC. 1990. Nose, larynx, and trachea. In: Pathology of the Fischer Rat: Reference and Atlas (Boorman GA, Eustis SL, Elwell MR, eds). Academic Press, San Diego, 315-337.

Harkema JR, Hotchkiss JA, Henderson RF. 1989. Effects of 0.12 and 0.80 ppm ozone on rat nasal and nasopharyngeal epithelial mucosubstances: Quantitative histochemistry. Toxicol Pathol 17:525-535.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2814228

Harkema JR, Morgan KT, Gross EA, Catalano PJ, Griffith WC. 1994. Consequences of Prolonged Inhalation of Ozone on F344/N Rats: Collaborative Studies. Part VII: Effects on the Nasal Mucociliary Apparatus. Research Report No. 65. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge, MA.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7888110

Herbert RA, Leninger JR. 1999. Nose, larynx, and trachea. In: Pathology of the Mouse: Reference and Atlas (Maronpot RR, ed). Cache River Press, Vienna, IL, 259-292.

Monticello TM, Morgan KT, Uraih LC. 1990. Nonneoplastic nasal lesions in rats and mice. Environ Health Perspect 85:249-274.
Full Text: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1568333/

National Toxicology Program. 1997. NTP TR-461. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Nitromethane (CAS No. 75-52-5) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/6066

National Toxicology Program. 1999. NTP TR-490. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Glutaraldehyde (CAS No. 111-30-8) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/10170

Renne R, Brix A, Harkema J, Kittel B, Lewis D, March T, Nagano K, Pino M, Rittinghausen S, Rosenbruch M, Tellier P, Wohrmann T. 2009. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse respiratory tract. Toxicol Pathol 37(7 suppl):5S-73S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20032296

Wagner JG, Hotchkiss JA, Harkema JR. 2001. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: Potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations. Environ Health Perspect 109:591-598.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11544169

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.