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Nose, Olfactory Epithelium - Atrophy

Image of atrophy in the nose, olfactory epithelium from a female B6C3F1/N mouse in a chronic study
Nose, Olfactory epithelium - Atrophy in a female B6C3F1/N mouse from a chronic study. The olfactory epithelium on the tip of the turbinate is thin due to loss of cells.
Figure 1 of 4
Image of atrophy in the nose, olfactory epithelium from a male B6C3F1/N mouse in a chronic study
Nose, Olfactory epithelium - Atrophy in a male B6C3F1/N mouse from a chronic study. Focal loss of cells results in thinning of the olfactory epithelium in the dorsal meatus at level II.
Figure 2 of 4
Image of atrophy in the nose, olfactory epithelium from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Nose, Olfactory epithelium - Atrophy in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study. The olfactory epithelium is thin in multiple areas (arrows).
Figure 3 of 4
Image of atrophy in the nose, olfactory epithelium from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Nose, Olfactory epithelium - Atrophy in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 3). The olfactory epithelium is thin (arrows) due to loss of cells.
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comment:

Olfactory epithelial atrophy is a loss of cells from the epithelium, resulting in a thinner and less cellular epithelium ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window , and Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window ). The epithelial surface may be covered with cuboidal to columnar nonciliated epithelium. It is often part of a spectrum of changes in the nose that includes inflammation, degeneration or necrosis, and respiratory or squamous metaplasia. In fact, olfactory epithelial atrophy is often the end result of degeneration or necrosis of the olfactory epithelium. The underlying turbinate bone may also be atrophic.

recommendation:

Olfactory epithelial atrophy should be diagnosed when a lesion is clearly separate from other olfactory epithelial changes such as degeneration, necrosis, or respiratory epithelial metaplasia. Inflammation, olfactory nerve atrophy, and turbinate atrophy may accompany the epithelial changes and should be diagnosed separately (see Nose - Inflammation; Nose, Nerve - Atrophy; and Nose, Turbinate - Atrophy).

references:

Hardisty JF, Garman RH, Harkema JR, Lomax LG, Morgan KT. 1999. Histopathology of nasal olfactory mucosa from selected inhalation toxicity studies conducted with volatile chemicals. Toxicol Pathol 27:618-627.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10588541

National Toxicology Program. 1993. NTP TR-431. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Benzyl Acetate (CAS No. 140-11-4) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Feed Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/6006

Renne R, Brix A, Harkema J, Kittel B, Lewis D, March T, Nagano K, Pino M, Rittinghausen S, Rosenbruch M, Tellier P, Wohrmann T. 2009. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse respiratory tract. Toxicol Pathol 37(7 suppl):5S-73S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20032296