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Eye, Cornea - Metaplasia, Goblet Cell

Image of cornea metaplasia, goblet cell in the eye from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Eye, Cornea - Metaplasia, Goblet cell in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study. There are clusters of cells similar to normal conjunctival goblet cells in the corneal epithelium (arrow).
Figure 1 of 2
Image of cornea metaplasia, goblet cell in the eye from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Eye, Cornea - Metaplasia, Goblet cell in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1). There are large goblet cells within the corneal epithelium (arrow).
Figure 2 of 2
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comment:

Goblet cells are normally present in the conjunctival epithelium, but when they appear in the corneal epithelium, it is recognized as a metaplasitic change ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ). Such so-called conjunctivalization of the corneal epithelium is considered a secondary reactive change, often associated with corneal neovascularization and/or inflammation from various causes.

recommendation:

Corneal goblet cell metaplasia should be diagnosed and assigned a severity grade whenever present. It is generally reactive and secondary to other pathologic processes, but it’s unusual nature necessitates its diagnosis. When present, inflammation should be diagnosed separately.

references:

Geiss V, Yoshitomi K. 1991. Eyes. In: Pathology of the Mouse: Reference and Atlas (Maronpot RR, Boorman GA, Gaul BW, eds). Cache River Press, Vienna, IL, 471-489.
Abstract: http://www.cacheriverpress.com/books/pathmouse.htm

Greaves P. 2007. Nervous system and special sense organs. In: Histopathology of Preclinical Toxicity Studies: Interpretation and Relevance in Drug Safety Evaluation, 3rd ed. Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 861-933.
Abstract: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780444527714

Joussen AM, Poulaki, V, Mitisiades N, Stechschulte SU, Kirchof B, Dartt DA, Fong G-H, Rudge J, Wiegans SJ, Yancopoulos GD, Adamis AP. 2003. VEGF-dependent conjunctivalization of the corneal surface. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 44:117-123.
Full Text: http://www.iovs.org/content/44/1/117.full

Maurer JK, Parker RD. 1996. Light microscopic comparison of surfactant-induced eye irritation in rabbits and rats at three hours and recovery/day 35. Toxicol Pathol 24:403-411.
Abstract: http://tpx.sagepub.com/content/24/4/403.short

National Toxicology Program. 1992. NTP TR-410. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Naphthalene (CAS No. 91-20-3) in B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/7700