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Eye, Vitreous - Hemorrhage

Image of vitreous hemorrhage in the eye from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Eye, Vitreous - Hemorrhage in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study. There are intravitreal accumulations of extravasated blood cells (arrow) with retinal detachment and degeneration (R).
Figure 1 of 4
Image of vitreous hemorrhage in the eye from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Eye, Vitreous - Hemorrhage in a male F344/N rat from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1). This higher magnification image shows the intravitreal hemorrhage (arrow) and retinal detachment and degeneration (R) in more detail.
Figure 2 of 4
Image of vitreous hemorrhage in the eye from a female F344/N rat in a chronic study
Eye, Vitreous - Hemorrhage in a female F344/N rat from a chronic study. There is vitreal hemorrhage (asterisk) with retinal detachment and degeneration (arrow).
Figure 3 of 4
Image of vitreous hemorrhage in the eye from a female F344/N rat in a chronic study
Eye, Vitreous - Hemorrhage in a female F344/N rat from a chronic study. Higher magnification of Figure 3. There is vitreal hemorrhage (asterisk) consisting of intravitreal accumulations of extravasated blood cells with retinal detachment and degeneration (arrow).
Figure 4 of 4
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comment:

Vitreous hemorrhage ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window , and Figure 4image opens in a pop-up window ) is characterized by accumulations of extravasated blood in the vitreous. Retinal detachment and/or degeneration are often present concurrently. Vitreous hemorrhage can be due to leakage from persistent fetal (hyaloid) vessels or from retinal vessels, can follow trauma from intravitreal injections or retro-orbital bleeding procedures, or can be secondary to inflammation.

recommendation:

Vitreous hemorrhage should be diagnosed and assigned a severity grade. If vitreal hemorrhage is secondary to other lesions (e.g., inflammation), it should not be diagnosed separately unless warranted by severity, but should be described in the pathology narrative.

references:

Kuno H, Usui T, Eydelloth RS, Wolf ED. 1991. Spontaneous ophthalmic lesions in young Sprague-Dawley rats. J Vet Med Sci 53:607-614.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10845604

National Toxicology Program. 1992. NTP TR-407. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of C.I. Pigment Red 3 (CAS No. 2425-85-6) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Feed Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/7694

National Toxicology Program. 1997. NTP TR-450. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Tetrafluoroethylene (CAS No. 116-14-3) in F344 Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies). NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Abstract: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/6044

Smith RS. 2002. Choroid, lens, and vitreous. In: Systematic Evaluation of the Mouse Eye: Anatomy, Pathology, and Biomethods (Smith RS, John SWM, Nishina PM, Sundberg JP, eds). CRC Press Boca Raton, FL, 161-193.

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.