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Kidney - Hyaline Glomerulopathy

Image of hyaline glomerulopathy in the kidney from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Kidney - Hyaline glomerulopathy in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study. Hyaline glomerulopathy is characterized by enlargement of the glomerular tufts by eosinophilic material.
Figure 1 of 3
Image of hyaline glomerulopathy in the kidney from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Kidney - Hyaline glomerulopathy in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1). Hypocellularity of the glomerulus is apparent.
Figure 2 of 3
Image of hyaline glomerulopathy in the kidney from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Kidney - Hyaline glomerulopathy in a female B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study. The material in the glomerulus stains strongly positive with periodic acid-Schiff.
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comment:

Hyaline glomerulopathy may occur as a spontaneous and/or treatment-related condition in B6C3F1 mice and a treatment-related condition in F344/N rats. It is characterized by several glomerular changes that include diffuse glomerular enlargement by an extracellular eosinophilic deposit accompanied by a reduction in glomerular tuft cellularity ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ). Hyaline glomerulopathy must be differentiated from amyloidosis. Special staining qualities, which help to distinguish it from amyloid, include period acid-Schiff negativity ( Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window ), Congo red negativity, and Masson’s trichrome positivity. Eosinophilic deposits occur only within the glomerulus and are not present in other organs. The term "hyaline nephropathy" is used to describe a specific glomerular lesion but does not indicate or define the composition of the accumulated material. Special studies outside the scope of routine histopathologic evaluation would be warranted.

recommendation:

Hyaline glomerulopathy should be diagnosed and graded whenever present. Grading should be based on the number of glomeruli affected and the amount of material within the affected glomeruli.

references:

Adams ET, Auerbach S, Blackshear PE, Bradley A, Gruebbel MM, Little PB, Malarkey D, Maronpot R, McKay JS, Miller RA, Moore RR, Morrison JP, Nyska A, Ramot Y, Rao D, Suttie A, Wells MY, Willson GA, Elmore SA. 2011. Proceedings of the 2010 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium. Toxicol Pathol 39:240-266.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21177527

Kouchi M, Toyosawa K, Matsumoto I, Michimae Y, Tochitani T, Koujitani T, Okimoto K, Funabashi H, Seki T. 2011. Hyaline glomerulopathy with tubulo-fibrillary deposits in young ddY mice. Toxicol Pathol 39:975-979.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21878553

Wojcinski ZW, Albassam MA, Smith GS. 1992. Hyaline glomerulopathy in B6C3F1 mice. Toxicol Pathol 19:224-229.

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.