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Urinary Bladder - Mineralization

Image of mineralization in the urinary bladder from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study
Focal basophilic deposits of serosal mineralization from a male F344/N rat in a chronic study.
Figure 1 of 2
Image of mineralization in the urinary bladder from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a subchronic study
Focal mineralization (arrow) of the bladder wall from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a subchronic study.
Figure 2 of 2
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comment:

Mineralization occurs as densely basophilic, granular material ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ). It usually involves the muscle wall of the urinary bladder. Dystrophic mineralization may be seen secondary to a variety of causes, especially in areas of necrosis. Metastatic mineralization is uncommon in the rodent bladder.

recommendation:

Mineralization should be diagnosed and given a severity grade when seen in the absence of other lesions (e.g., metastatic mineralization) or, if it is secondary to another process (e.g., dystrophic mineralization), when it is a significant component of the lesion.

references:

Frazier KS, Seely JC, Hard GC, Betton G, Burnett R, Nakatsuji S, Nishikawa A, Durchfeld-Meyer B, Bube A. 2012. Proliferative and non-proliferative lesions in the rat and mouse urinary system. Toxicol Pathol 40:14S-86S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22637735

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.