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  • Gallbladder - Hyaline Droplet Accumulation

    Image of hyaline droplet accumulation in the gallbladder from a male  B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
    Hyaline droplet accumulation in the gallbladder in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study.
    Figure 1 of 3
    Image of hyaline droplet accumulation in the gallbladder from a male  B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
    Hyaline droplet accumulation in the gallbladder in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study (higher magnification of Figure 1).
    Figure 2 of 3
    Image of hyaline droplet accumulation in the gallbladder from a male  B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
    Hyaline droplet accumulation with extracellular crystalline material in the gallbladder in a male B6C3F1 mouse from a chronic study.
    Figure 3 of 3
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    comment:

    Cytoplasmic inclusions of homogeneous eosinophilic hyaline-like material may be seen in older mice in intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells, as well as epithelial cells in the gallbladder ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window , Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window , and Figure 3image opens in a pop-up window ). In marked cases, there is hyperplasia of the glandular epithelium, and crystalline forms of the eosinophilic inclusion material may be present both intracellularly and extracellularly. The hyaline material has been identified as a chitinase-like protein of unknown function.

    recommendation:

    Hyaline droplet accumulation should be diagnosed and given a severity grade, and salient features should be described in the pathology narrative. Associated lesions, such as inflammation or epithelial cell degeneration, necrosis, or hyperplasia, should be diagnosed separately if sufficiently prominent.

    references:

    Harada T, Enomoto A, Boorman GA, Maronpot RR. 1999. Liver and gallbladder. In: Pathology of the Mouse: Reference and Atlas (Maronpot RR, Boorman GA, Gaul BW, eds). Cache River Press, Vienna, IL, 119-183.
    Abstract: http://www.cacheriverpress.com/books/pathmouse.htm

    Hsu L, Diwan B, Ward JM, Noguchi CT. 2006. Pathology of ‘‘Berkeley’’ sickle-cell mice includes gallstones, priapism. Blood 107:3414-3415.
    Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16597602

    Thoolen B, Maronpot RR, Harada T, Nyska A, Rousseaux C, Nolte T, Malarkey D, Kaufmann W, Kutter K, Deschl U, Nakae D, Gregson R, Winlove M, Brix A, Singl B, Belpoggi F, Ward JM. 2010. Hepatobiliary lesion nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for lesions in rats and mice (INHAND). Toxicol Pathol 38:5S-81S.
    Full Text: http://tpx.sagepub.com/content/38/7_suppl/5S.full

    Ward JM, Yoon M, Anver MR, Haines DC, Kudo G, Gonzalez FJ, Kimura S. 2001. Hyalinosis and Ym1/Ym2 gene expression in the stomach and respiratory tract of 129S4/SvJae and wild-type and CYP1A2-null B6, 129 mice. Am J Pathol 158:323-332.
    Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11141507

    Yang YH, Campbell JS. 1964. Crystalline excrements in bronchitis and cholecystitis of mice. Am J Pathol 45:337-345.
    Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1907179/