Your browser does not support JavaScript or has JavaScript turned off. The Atlas functions best with JavaScript enabled but may used without JavaScript.

Urinary Bladder - Infiltration Cellular, Lymphocyte

Image of infiltrative cellular, lymphocyte in the urinary bladder from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Infiltrative cellular, lymphocyte- focal lymphoid aggregate underlying the urothelium from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study.
Figure 1 of 2
Image of infiltrative cellular, lymphocyte in the urinary bladder from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study
Infiltrative cellular, lymphocyte- focal lymphoid aggregates underlying the urothelium from a female B6C3F1 mouse in a chronic study.
Figure 2 of 2
next arrow

comment:

Infiltration cellular, lymphocyte, usually involves a focal to multifocal, well-defined, suburothelial infiltration of predominantly lymphocytes ( Figure 1image opens in a pop-up window and Figure 2image opens in a pop-up window ). Infiltrates can also be seen around vessels. Most cellular infiltrates tend to be spontaneous, in an otherwise normal bladder, and with little or no pathologic significance.

recommendation:

Since smaller infiltrates are common in rodent bladders, it is not uncommon for pathologists to have a diagnostic threshold for diagnosing these infiltrates. It is the responsibility of the pathologist to determine the threshold and to consistently maintain that threshold throughout the study. When diagnosed, lymphoid infiltrates should be given a severity score.

references:

Frazier KS, Seely JC, Hard GC, Betton G, Burnett R, Nakatsuji S, Nishikawa A, Durchfeld-Meyer B, Bube A. 2012. Proliferative and non-proliferative lesions in the rat and mouse urinary system. Toxicol Pathol 40:14S-86S.
Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22637735

NTP is located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.